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  • Tips For A Sustainable Future

    Published Jul 10 2020 in Customer Appreciation, customers, diane kennedy, eco, eco friendly, environmentally friendly, ethical, Ethics, Fall Fashion, green living, inspiration, Made in Canada, sustainable, zero waste

    You may remember a recent blog, about a certain Well-Dressed Climate Scientist...

    Well, we were curious to hear more from her, so after a few friendly e-mails, we asked her how we can "do better" for our earth. And so, she was kind enough to share some of her tips on how we can all live a greener lifestyle and share the global responsibility we have in protecting our environment. Read on!

    “Do the best you can until you know better. Then when you know better, do better.”
    - Maya Angelou

    Karen Kohfeld
    Photo provided by Dr. Kohfeld. Fall 2019. She is wearing our Perception Tunic & Heather Charcoal Cozy Coat

    If we could all do 3 simple things on a consistent basis to best reduce our impact on the environment, what would they be?

    Just three? 😊

    Ok...Here we go!

    1. Travel less, and use lower-impact forms of transport.

    We've seen with the COVID-19 lockdown that daily greenhouse gas emissions around the world decreased by 17% in early April 2020!

    This was in part because we weren't driving and flying. Many large cities around the world have been converting street space so that it can be used for pedestrians and cyclists, and there's a possibility that some of these changes could become permanent. 

    Imagine, as we move forward, that we continue to walk, bicycle and telecommute more often, rather than spending hours in our single-occupancy, gas-powered vehicles. We'd reduce our dependency on oil, reduce our greenhouse gas emissions, and we'd feel healthier, too.

    2. Change our consumption patterns.

    By now most of us have heard of "reduce, reuse, recycle," and now we can add "refuse" and "rot" (composting) to those. We have the information out there to become informed consumers, and we can refuse to buy things (plastics and single-use products) that contribute to environmental waste.

    Diane, you yourself have posted about how the fashion industry, for example, is a major contributor to greenhouse gas emissions worldwide, but you've shown that it doesn't have to be. We can, to the best of our abilities and where possible, make informed choices.

    3. Vote for laws and policy makers who put sustainable environmental policies in place.

    We have the technology to transform our transportation and energy sectors in Canada, but truly battling climate change will require that we vote for system-wide policies and changes.

    Numbers 4, 5, and 6 would be to have difficult conversations with your friends and family so that they are aware; reduce your personal energy consumption; and reduce your reliance on meats and vegetables produced through industrial farming (i.e. buy local!)


    Thank you so much for this well-written advice, Dr. Kohfeld! We hope our readers are inspired and encouraged by your words 💚


    Diane Kennedy Signature

  • What makes our Bamboo Fabric different; Part 1

    Published Oct 17 2019 in bamboo, eco friendly, garment manufacturing, Made in Canada, sustainable

    There are very few fabrics that get a perfect report card in terms of what's best for the environment. To access any fabric, it's important to look at the whole process; where it comes from in the beginning, how it's made and the end of the cycle as well. As an eco-conscious company, we want to share with you the reasons we've chosen to use Canadian made bamboo in our designs.

    If you have worn our bamboo clothing, you'll already know that it is naturally soft, drapes beautifully and is extremely comfortable to wear. This was our original inspiration for using organic bamboo for our designs. As awareness grows for the health and wellness of our planet, using natural fabrics has become a movement rather than just a trend.

    It's important to us to source our fabric in Canada as much as possible because the standards for (water) waste management and pollution are so much higher than other countries where Bamboo usually comes from.

    Water pollution in Jian River, China

    photo credit: RiverBlue

    Natural Fibers

    Sustainable fabric is sourced from the environment, this can occur in one of two ways, either plant-based fibers (like linen, cotton, bamboo) or sourced from animals, (like silk, wool, cashmere) The fibers are grown, extracted and spun into yarn that is then used to either knit or weave textiles. By contrast, polyester; a synthetic petroleum-based fiber, is made from a carbon-intensive non-renewable resource.

    Bamboo, the Plant

    Bamboo is a wonderfully beneficial plant and just might be the world’s most sustainable resource. It does not require the use of pesticides and herbicides for crop production, as a result, plantations can easily be kept organic. Additionally, as the plant is flood and drought resistant, water irrigation is not necessary for production, requiring very little maintenance.

    It’s extremely fast growing and can grow up to a meter or more per day. It produces a huge biomass, both above and below the ground. Growing bamboo improves soil quality and helps rebuild eroded soil. The extensive root system of bamboo prevents soil erosion by holding the soil together and retaining water. It doesn’t require replanting each season because its vast root network continually sprouts new shoots, all the while converting sunlight and greenhouse gases into new growth. One study found that when planted in large groves, it can store 4 times the CO2 as a stand of trees of a similar size. 

    Diane Kennedy Bamboo Made in Canada

     

    Sustainability

    The second step of sustainable fabrics is how the fabric is manufactured into textiles and the impact that manufacturing has on the environment. This includes energy consumption and water consumption during manufacturing. The objective is to keep both consumption rates to a minimum. 

    Energy Use

    We purchase about 85% of our bamboo fabric from a mill in Canada, which uses hydro-electricity, and green energy. The natural flow of water in rivers offers kinetic power that can be transformed into usable energy. To produce hydroelectricity, the water flow is directed to the blades of a turbine, making it spin, which causes an electrical generator connected to the turbine to spin as well. This generates electricity. Our supplier uses a combination of hydroelectricity and natural gas, which is used to heat the boilers that heats the water used to dye the fabric. In contrast, fabric made in China uses coal to fuel factories which causes so much pollution it can be seen from satellite photos.

    These are just some of the reasons that make our bamboo fabric different. Please, visit our blog next week to read part 2.

     

     

     

  • How To Care For Your Bamboo Garments

    Published Aug 01 2019 in diane kennedy, eco, eco friendly, environmentally friendly, ethical, ethical fashion, shop local, shopping, silver models, style, sustainable, washing, zero waste

    Bamboo Garment Care

    If there's one thing that Diane Kennedy customers love about our garments, it's how effortless they are. Effortless to wear and care for, that is! Our signature bamboo fabrics are not only incredibly soft and comfortable, but they are also just as easy-breezy to maintain.

    diane kennedy, bamboo dress, eco-friendly garments

    Washing / Drying

    We recommend machine washing our bamboo garments in cold water using a mild eco-friendly soap. After washing, we suggest laying flat or hanging to dry. It's ok to put them in the dryer for a few minutes to get some of the moisture out, but please be sure to hang them up right away afterwards. Our bamboo fabric can hold quite a bit of moisture due to its unique cellular properties. It's ok to hang tops and 'shorter items', but longer items like pants might need to be laid flat to dry to ensure no stretching occurs. For longer tunics and bottoms, draping over a rack best preserves the shape of our garments.

    Bamboo, eco, natural fabrics, diane kennedy garments

    Packing for Travel

    You may already know that our garments travel exceptionally well. Our pieces fold so nicely & efficiently that it makes packing very easy; whether you're getting ready to take Diane Kennedy on a trip, or just switching over your closet's seasons. To minimize wrinkles, lay your garment flat, folding in the sleeves and hem (vertically, from top to bottom) into a rectangle, then simply roll up your garments starting from the neck. When you get to your destination, shake them out and hang them up, no ironing needed! Any wrinkles will fall out shortly.

    Find our newest Bamboo tops and bottoms in our New Arrivals section and visit our website to see our July Clearance items. There are plenty of great savings still to be had!

     

  • Why you should choose Natural Fibers

    Published May 03 2019 in bamboo, design, eco, eco friendly, environmentally friendly, ethical, ethical fashion, fabric, green living, local, Made in Canada, natural, nature, slow fashion, spring, sustainable

    There's always a story about the latest thing we shouldn't eat or product not to use. But as conscious consumers, we can't help but want to make the best choices. Now that microbeads (found in our toothpaste and beauty products) have been listed as a toxic substance (and already banned in the US), they've found an even more pervasive problem— fibers shedding from synthetic clothing. These microfibers get released in the clothes washer and make their way into our oceans. Washing just one synthetic fleece garment can release approximately 1.7 grams of microfibers with each wash. So choosing organic, sustainable and biodegradable fibers may be even more important than previously thought.

    New studies indicate that synthetics like polyester could be poisoning our lakes and oceans and therefore our food supply on a massive scale. Synthetic fibers have been found in the gastrointestinal tracts of fish! These tiny threads shed from fabrics could ultimately be of huge concern as they enter the food chain and have the potential to accumulate in the bodies of larger mammals. We, at the top of the food chain, are, of course, eating these fibers when we consume the fish.

    Microfibers

    Tiny fibers emitted from synthetic clothing when washed are entering our oceans and waterways at an alarming rate. 

    While this is a problem without an easy solution, if you're already a consumer of natural fibers, you're obviously doing the right thing. Aside from the many other obvious advantages of bamboo, it's 100% biodegradable. So once it's no longer wearable, in as little as a year, it will have decomposed back into the soil or ocean without the production of any pollutants.

    Choose bamboo and other natural fiber clothing over synthetics

    While very few fabrics and methods of dying fabrics can get a 100% clean bill of health, bamboo has many impressive ecological credentials. By nature bamboo as a plant is fast growing and requires no pesticides or additional fertilizers. Another key benefit of bamboo is that it requires one-third of the amount of water required to grow cotton. One of the other benefits is that, in comparison to an equivalent area of trees, bamboo takes in five times as much carbon dioxide and releases 35% more oxygen. One of the drawbacks of bamboo processing has been the chemicals used, but new mechanical methods of processing have been devised in where the crushed bamboo is treated with biological enzymes. This breaks the bamboo into a mushy mass and individual fibers are then combed out. Although expensive, this process is eco-friendly.

    While not the ultimate solution, every step helps. We're suggesting that you keep choosing the most natural products possible for inside and outside your body.

     

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